Pupil Premium Statement 2016-2017

Pupil Premium is an additional payment from the Department for Education to the academy for each student that meets set criteria. Students attract Pupil Premium funding if they are;

  1. in receipt of free school meals (fsm) or have been in receipt of fsm in the last six years
  2. looked after by the local authority
  3. children of armed service personnel

As part of the funding agreement between Green Spring Education Trust and the Department for Education, the academy is required to publish on its website information relating to Pupil Premium funding. This includes;

  • How the funds were spent in the previous academic year (2016/17)
  • The impact of that spending in the prior year (2016/17)
  • The amount of pupil premium funding the academy will receive in the current academic year 2017/18
  • How the academy intends to spend the funding in 2017/18

Details of Pupil Premium Expenditure for years 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 can be viewed here.

Pupil Premium Statement 2017-2018

Pupil Premium Impact Statement
Mulberry Academy Shoreditch

Pupil Premium Impact Statement
Mulberry Academy Shoreditch

Pupil Premium is additional funding for publicly-funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils of all abilities and to close the gaps between them and their peers.

Overall impact in 2018

  • Progress 8 for disadvantaged students: 0.21 (national -0.38)
  • Gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students’ Progress 8: -0.03 (national -0.50)
  • Mulberry Academy Shoreditch was recognised, by the DFE in 2016/17, as one of the top performing in the region, in terms of outcomes for disadvantaged pupils.

2017/18 Funding

Mulberry Academy Shoreditch is a school with a very high proportion of students that attract Pupil Premium funding. The most recent data showed that 74% of students at the academy were classified as requiring Pupil Premium funding. For the academic year 2017/18 the academy received £601,515.

Use and Impact on Educational Attainment

Historically, the academy has successfully implemented strategies to make the most effective use of Pupil Premium funding to support a variety of interventions and activities. For 2017/18 this included:

Focus Detail
Breakfast Club Providing a free hot breakfast to all students from 7.30am until 8.10am
Homework Club Running two evenings a week from 3.30pm until 5.00pm
Daily after school club Saturday School and Holiday Club for new to the country students to develop their English language skills
Tutoring Academic tutoring in English, Mathematics and Science before school, after school, on Saturdays and during school holidays
Residential visits Mathematics residential trips for targeted students
Increased staffing Staffing in the core subjects to reduce class sizes
Additional support Staffing in the areas of Literacy and English as an Additional Language Departments
Arts & Culture Arts and culture programme for students from all year groups

 

Impact on Educational Attainment – Year 11

Out of 169 students in last year’s Y11 cohort, 90 students (53%) attracted the Pupil Premium compared to the national figure of only 29%.

Disadvantaged students made less progress (Progress 8) for their starting points than non-disadvantaged students:

Disadvantaged Progress 8 = 0.21

Non-disadvantaged Progress 8 = 0.24

However, disadvantaged students progressed from their starting points at a rate which is above the progress rate of non-disadvantaged students nationally.

The Progress 8 gap, in school, between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students (-0.02) was dramatically smaller than the national gap in maintained schools of -0.50.

All disadvantaged groups, based on prior attainment, made progress above national levels,with middle prior attainment making significantly. Low prior attainers did not make as much progress as the others.

Disadvantaged students made progress in the English (0.57), maths (0.28) and EBACC (0.23) elements significantly above non-disadvantaged students nationally. The Open (-0.10) element is above the national progress 8 figures for disadvantaged students.

Last year there were no significant gaps between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students in most of the headline attainment figures:

Headline figure Disadvantaged Non-disadvantaged
9-5 English & maths 41% 47%
EBACC: strong pass 24% 24%
Entering EBACC 89% 91%

 

Impact on Educational Attainment – Year 10

Out of 160 students in the 2017 Y10 cohort 119, (74%) attracted the Pupil Premium.

In all subjects disadvantaged students perform in line with their non-disadvantaged counterparts. In Bengali, business, economics, geography, psychology and Spanish disadvantaged students are closer to their targets than non-disadvantaged.

19.3% of disadvantaged students, compared to 43.9% of non-disadvantaged, are currently achieving 9-5 in English and maths.

Impact on Educational Attainment – Year 9

Out of 181 students in the 2017 Y9 cohort 139, (77%) attracted the Pupil Premium.

In all subjects disadvantaged students perform in line with their non-disadvantaged counterparts. In art, computer science, drama, French, history, maths, music, Psychology, science and Spanish disadvantaged students are closer to their targets than non-disadvantaged.

12.2% of disadvantaged students, compared to 9.5% of non-disadvantaged, are currently achieving 9-5 in English and maths.

Impact on Educational Attainment – Year 8

Out of 170 students in the 2017 Y8 cohort 143, (84%) attracted the Pupil Premium

82.3% of disadvantaged students, compared to 82.9% of non-disadvantaged, are meeting or exceeding age expected progress. Disadvantaged students make more progress that non-disadvantaged in art, French, geography, history, Latin, RE, and Science.

Impact on Educational Attainment – Year 7

Out of 164 students in the 2017 Y7 cohort 119, (73%) attracted the Pupil Premium

87.5% of disadvantaged students, compared to 86.1% of non-disadvantaged, are meeting or exceeding age expected progress. There is less than 5% gap in most subjects, Disadvantaged students make more progress that non-disadvantaged in art, English, Geography, ICT, maths, PE, Spanish and Technology.

Priorities for 2018/19

This data has informed our priorities for 2018/19 which are:

  • students achieving grade 5 in maths
  • progress of higher attainers
  • students of low attainment making progress
  • Improving progress overall

These are whole school priorities that apply to both advantaged and non-disadvantaged students.

Year 7 Catch up Funding 2017-2018

Year 7 Catch up Funding 2016/17

Year 7 catch up funding is allocated to each student who achieved below a score of 100 in Key Stage 2 Outcomes. Funding for 2017/18, received in March 2018, was £9,189.

Use of funding

The English department targeted support for those who needed it to meet their projected targets. In both set 3 groups there was a second member of staff to assist the class every lesson who worked specifically with a group of students to help them access the current lesson or to improve literacy skills. This was either in class or in a breakout area within the school. We used ‘Renaissance Place- Accelerated Reader’ and ‘Star Reading’ tests to monitor the students’ reading age in baseline tests then throughout KS3 to ensure progress.

The maths department undertook initial baseline tests on each year 7 students. The most underachieving students were then targeted to be part of a support programme to bridge these gaps. The tasks for each student were based around their baseline assessment and areas of apparent weakness were highlighted and targeted.

2018 / 2019

The funding for Catch up for 2018 / 2019 has not yet been received but in the interim period we are delivering the same strategies as above but with additional discreet lesson on Maths and English, small group work and use of the new Librarian and reading systems.